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Our School

Our School

All children deserve an excellent education. I am very proud to lead an academy full of wonderful staff who go ‘above and beyond’ to ensure that our students are actively engaged in school, happy and making progress.

At the heart of our work is a pursuit of excellence as we believe this is the best way to do well by our children. This encompasses both academic excellence and the cultivation of character. We want to give our students deep subject knowledge, but we also want to help them to become life- long learners who can thrive in the 21st century.

We know that every child needs great teaching in order to thrive. Our students find learning exciting. We plan activities that make them think and that create ‘awe and wonder’ in the classroom. We create opportunities for them to learn together, in pairs and in groups, and to discuss what they are learning because that is what they enjoy. Overall, we aim to ensure that they receive a balanced diet of independent and collaborative learning activities, which are carefully crafted to maximise participation and progress.

Children also need opportunities to thrive beyond the classroom. Therefore, we offer a huge variety of workshops and trips, including ‘outward bound’ adventures, to excite and enthuse our students.

We also aim to build competition into school life as we like our students to experience the joy of ‘winning’. However, we recognise that real learning also comes from failure and so we define excellence as the ability to bounce back!

In this section of the website, you can find out much more about what it means to be a ‘thinking school’ and also find information about how we care for your child.

If you have any feedback for us about the quality of education your child is receiving, please complete the Parentview survey. If you wish to become more involved in the development of the school, there are opportunities to join the Academy Advisory Board. Please contact the Principal’s PA to book an informal chat with the Principal about this opportunity.

Rachel Grey BA(Hons)
Principal

Rachel Grey, Principal
David Lycett, Community – Chair Person
Paul Bido, Parent
Sarah Blackmore, Staff
Josh Breach, Community
Matt Foster, Community
Steph Lowry, Staff
Louise Phipp, Parent
Emma Oakley, Parent
George Stevens, Staff
Sue Wood, Clerk

Contact Governors

If you would like to join our governing body, or contact us about any concerns or issues, please contact the Clerk to the Governing Body via the school:

Clerk to the Governing Body
St Mary’s Road
Portsmouth
PO1 5PF

We have been awarded £5.3m by Portsmouth City Council to expand our school in order to provide more places for students as we are now heavily oversubscribed. Building Work is planned to start in Easter 2019 and to be completed by August 2020 ready for September. You can see the plans here..
The next step is to gain planning permission. We will keep the website updated with news of developments on the building plans.

The catch-up premium provides an additional £500 of funding for pupils in Year 7 who have not achieved Level 4 in English or Maths at Key Stage 2. The report below aims to explain how this funding is used at The Portsmouth Academy  and the impact of the strategies used.

Literacy & numeracy

Welcome to our community pages.   We are proud to be at the heart of Portsmouth.

Role Member
Principal Rachel Grey
Chair/Community Member Dave Lycett
Parent Member Emma Oakley
Community Member Matthew Foster
Community Member Joshua Breach
Staff Member George Stevens
Staff Member Stephanie Lowry
Staff Member Sarah Blackmore
Overall effectiveness Good Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page
Effectiveness of leadership and management Outstanding
Quality of teaching, learning and assessment Good
Personal development, behaviour and welfare Good
Outcomes for pupils Good

“The school’s culture is now very aspirational –
pupils develop the resilience needed to rise to the challenge.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“Teachers have high expectations
and are skilled at improving pupils’ knowledge and understanding.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“The school has a strong culture of safeguarding.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“Teaching is effective and meets students needs well.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“Pupils’ conduct, in lessons and around the school,
at break and lunchtimes, is excellent.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“The teaching of English and literacy across the school is very effective.
Pupils enjoy reading for pleasure and write fluently.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“Progress is now significantly above national averages
in a range of subjects, including both English and mathematics.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“Pupils respect the rights of others and celebrate differences.”

Ofsted, April 2017

“Pupils are happy at school and proud to be members of its community.
They respect the well-kept splendid environment for learning
and are rarely late for lessons.”

Ofsted, April 2017

 

The academy aspires to the very best for each child; however we cannot do it on our own.

Research shows that parental involvement in a child’s education can make the difference of up to 30% improvement on achievement. We expect all parents to support the ethos and aspirations of The Portsmouth Academy. We ask you support us through ensuring your child:

  • Attends regularly, we expect pupils to reach a target of 95% attendance
  • Arrives punctually, in correct uniform, and fully equipped for learning
  • Completes all home learning on time and to a high standard ensuring they are supported at home to achieve this
  • We ask you to attend all school functions that involve your child. This includes: parent consultation evenings, safety on the internet, parents’ forums and for year 7, a meet and greet evening in the autumn term
  • We ask you to support us in promoting positive attitudes to learning
  • We hope parents and carers will consider becoming a parent governor or member of our parent-staff association.

Please see below electronic versions of the school policies. Printed copies are available upon request.

Please see our full list of information we can provide and any cost that will be incurred.

Printed copies are available upon request.

Printed copies are available upon request.

Printed copies are available upon request.

Admissions Policies

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page The Academy ethos is to support every child’s development in ways that will foster security, confidence and independence, by developing an environment in which children and young people feel safe, secure, valued and respected and feel confident in approaching adults if they are in difficulties, believing they will be effectively listened to.

We have been successful in raising the awareness of all staff (teaching and non-teaching) in the importance of safeguarding children in education and of their responsibilities in identifying and reporting possible cases of concern. The Academy also complies with the requirements of the Counter Terrorism and Security Act in understanding and addressing all forms of radicalisation and having due regard for the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism we act in accordance with its “Prevent” duty.
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We encourage parents to read the Prevent Duty and also the guidance about social media.

Related Policies

TPA Pupil Premium Spending Principles

Spending principles
• Our ambition is to secure outstanding outcomes for our children irrespective of their starting points, or social backgrounds. A letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw (10.09.15) commends the leadership of the school in addressing a legacy of underachievement, inadequate teaching and poor behaviour and helping to close the gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils.
• Our spending decisions are influenced by both the research evidence of what works best, and our knowledge of our children and what we know works best. We believe in providing them with a solid academic education and giving them access to opportunities which will broaden their horizons.

Three key strategies for raising the achievement of dis-advantaged pupils are mentioned below
1) Our culture of ‘Aspire and Achieve’. We have high expectations for our children and encourage them to pursue their goals. We teach them the ‘habits of excellence’ needed for success.
2) The ‘Thinking school’ and the importance of meta-cognition. We teach our children how to learn using a variety of thinking tools which enable them to become life-long learners.
3) We place a strong emphasis on the regularity of assessment, with an associated very high quality of marking and feedback to each and every child so they know their ‘next steps’ in learning.

See the PP spending plans for more insight into how we have allocated the funding and the expected success we will see as a result.

The Government has announced that it will not publish any school or college level educational performance data based on tests, assessments or exams for 2020. This update published here clarifies what this means for the way school and college accountability will operate for 2019/20.

Our Pupils

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— Schools Minister Lord Agnew praises school’s results —

Students and staff at The Portsmouth Academy are celebrating another fantastic set of GCSE results – with praise for their results coming from Schools Minister Lord Agnew.  

The Year 11 2019 students (40% of whom come from disadvantaged backgrounds), have managed to gain on average in excess of 8 qualifications each, with a quarter of these grades at 7+ (equivalent to A*/A).  

Almost two-thirds (64%) of all qualifications were Grade 4 (equivalent Grade C) or above which is an incredible achievement and 51% were a Grade 5 (defined as a strong pass).

Students continue to attain exceptionally well in Maths, English, Triple Science, History and RE with all subjects achieving highly positive progress from students’ starting points.

Of the Year 11 students, 38% were considered to be highly able academically. They achieved an average of 10 qualifications each and 32% of their grades were an 8 or 9 (A*).

  • One of these students, Laura Day, achieved 11 GCSEs with 5 Grade 9s including Further Maths at A* Distinction.

The achievement of students who have English as an additional language continues to be a great source of pride for both the school and the local community:

  • Rahima Bibi achieved 4 Grade 9s, 4 Grade 8s and a Grade A at Further Maths.
  • Niha Yasmin Ali, who also has a special educational need, achieved 9 GCSEs including 5 Grade 7s and two Grade 6s.

Schools Minister Lord Agnew said:

 “Today marks the culmination of much hard work from students and teachers alike, and I want to congratulate all those involved in the results at The Portsmouth Academy, and the wider team at Thinking Schools Academy Trust.

 “GCSE results can be the springboard for a whole career, so whether young people choose further study through A levels, an apprenticeship or a vocational qualification, they should be full of excitement about the next stage in their lives.”

Principal Natalie Sheppard, who is stepping up to the newly created role of Director of Education for the Thinking Schools Portsmouth Hub from September with Rachel Grey becoming Principal, said:

“We are so delighted with these wonderful exam results because we understand the doors these will open for our students. They worked hard and rose to the challenge.

 “I would like to thank the brilliant staff at TPA who always provide incredible support for students. They continually motivate and challenge students to ‘Aspire and Achieve’ and offer them additional support where needed. This is what makes the difference in transforming life chances.

 “I am excited at supporting The Portsmouth Academy in my new role and know that Rachel will continue to provide excellent leadership and ensure the school goes from strength to strength.”

The Portsmouth Academy, rated by Ofsted as Good with Outstanding Leadership, is a member of the Thinking Schools Academy Trust (TSAT), a family of 17 high-performing schools across the South East that prides itself on providing a high-quality education to all students.

Our Data

The following charts are taken from the Department for Education’s comparison website

Progress 8

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The local authority (Portsmouth) average score for state-funded schools is -0.42

The average score for all state-funded schools in England is -0.03

This score shows how much progress pupils at this school made between the end of key stage 2 and the end of key stage 4, compared to pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 2. This is based on results in up to 8 qualifications, which include English, maths, 3 English Baccalaureate qualifications including sciences, computer science, history, geography and languages, and 3 other additional approved qualifications.

A score above zero means pupils made more progress, on average, than pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 2.

A score below zero means pupils made less progress, on average, than pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 2.

A negative progress score does not mean pupils made no progress, or the school has failed, rather it means pupils in the school made less progress than other pupils across England with similar results at the end of key stage 2.

Detailed guide to Progress 8 – for more information about how the Progress 8 score is calculated.

‘Attainment 8’ score

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Schools get a score based on how well pupils have performed in up to 8 qualifications, which include English, maths, 3 English Baccalaureate qualifications including sciences, computer science, history, geography and languages, and 3 other additional approved qualifications.

Grade 5 or above in English & maths GCSEs

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This tells you the percentage of pupils who achieved grade 5 or above in the 2017 reformed English and maths GCSEs opens in a new window. Reformed GCSEs are graded 1 (low) to 9 (high). Grade 5 in the new grading is a similar level of achievement to a high grade C or low grade B in the old grading.

EBacc average point score

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The EBacc APS calculates a pupil’s average point scores across the 5 pillars of the English Baccalaureate, allocating points to a pupil’s best grades and dividing by 6 (the science grades count in 2 pillars, meaning a total of 6 pillars) to create an average point score per pupil. This measure is an average across the subjects (i.e. we divide the total by 6) and so is on a different scale to Attainment 8 which we calculated by simply awarding points score across 8 qualifications (without dividing the total).

This measure is based on the better result of either English language or English literature when both subjects are taken, maths, the best 2 results from the single sciences (3 out of 4 must be taken), or results from the combined science, the better result from either geography or history and the best result in languages.

For more information about how the EBacc average point score is calculated view the detailed guide to EBacc APS

Staying in education or entering employment

This shows the number of pupils who either stayed in education or went into employment after finishing key stage 4 (after year 11, usually aged 16). This is for pupils who finished year 11 in 2016, which is the most recent data currently available. This figure covers any sustained education or employment destination.

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School Performance Tables

School Performance Tables are published by the Secretary of State on the Department for Education’s website. The Tables give information on the achievement and attainment of pupils and include information on finance, absence, school workforce and the most recent Ofsted reports.

The attainment and progress data in the Tables is designed to be considered alongside other sources of information such as Ofsted reports and school prospectuses.

To view the School Performance Tables for The Portsmouth Academy, please visit the Department for Education’s website

Our Pupils

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The delighted Year 11 students, more than half of whom are classed as “disadvantaged”, have achieved an average of eight GCSEs each this year – and nearly a quarter of all grades are at 7, 8 or 9, the equivalents of A* or A grades. Two-thirds of all GCSE grade were a grade 4 (a pass and equivalent to the old grade C) or better, with excellent achievement also at grade 5 or better, which is considered a strong pass. More than half of all students achieved a strong pass or better in English, Maths and Triple Science.
These results have been achieved in spite of this being the first year in which all GCSEs are at a new, tougher standard, including more challenging content and questions. Significant changes to grading have been introduced, while assessment is now based on exams only, rather than coursework. There have also been additional exam papers – with some TPA students having taken as many as 28 exams.
Particularly excellent individual student performances include:

  • Sara Eftekhari, who is the school’s highest-attaining student – boasting an amazing 11 GCSEs, all at Grade 9 (A*).
  • Head Girl Chloe Abraham, who achieved 10 GCSEs, of which four were the highest possible Grade 9 (A*).
  • Students with English as a second or additional language, including Aiya Abdalla, who joined TPA later than some of her fellow students, and achieved 10 GCSEs including a Grade 8 in English Literature; and Naima Ali, who achieved 10 GCSEs, all at 7 or above, with five at Grade 9. Grade 9 is considered to be in the top 3-5% of students nationally.

Other highlights from this year’s results include:

  • Of the Year 11 students, 28% were considered to be highly able academically. They achieved an average of 10 qualifications each and more than a quarter of their grades were an 8 or 9 (A or A*).
  • Achievement in Modern Foreign Languages was very strong, with half of all students gaining a 7 or higher.
  • In the Humanities, progress has been exceptional, with students significantly exceeding their targets.

 

Our Data

The following charts are taken from the Department for Education’s comparison website

Progress 8

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This score shows how much progress pupils at this school made between the end of key stage 2 and the end of key stage 4, compared to pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 2. This is based on results in up to 8 qualifications, which include English, maths, 3 English Baccalaureate qualifications including sciences, computer science, history, geography and languages, and 3 other additional approved qualifications.

A score above zero means pupils made more progress, on average, than pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 2.

A score below zero means pupils made less progress, on average, than pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 2.

A negative progress score does not mean pupils made no progress, or the school has failed, rather it means pupils in the school made less progress than other pupils across England with similar results at the end of key stage 2.

Detailed guide to Progress 8 – for more information about how the Progress 8 score is calculated.

‘Attainment 8’ score

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Schools get a score based on how well pupils have performed in up to 8 qualifications, which include English, maths, 3 English Baccalaureate qualifications including sciences, computer science, history, geography and languages, and 3 other additional approved qualifications.

Grade 5 or above in English & maths GCSEs

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page

 

This tells you the percentage of pupils who achieved grade 5 or above in the 2017 reformed English and maths GCSEs opens in a new window. Reformed GCSEs are graded 1 (low) to 9 (high). Grade 5 in the new grading is a similar level of achievement to a high grade C or low grade B in the old grading.

EBacc average point score

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page

The EBacc APS calculates a pupil’s average point scores across the 5 pillars of the English Baccalaureate, allocating points to a pupil’s best grades and dividing by 6 (the science grades count in 2 pillars, meaning a total of 6 pillars) to create an average point score per pupil. This measure is an average across the subjects (i.e. we divide the total by 6) and so is on a different scale to Attainment 8 which we calculated by simply awarding points score across 8 qualifications (without dividing the total).

This measure is based on the better result of either English language or English literature when both subjects are taken, maths, the best 2 results from the single sciences (3 out of 4 must be taken), or results from the combined science, the better result from either geography or history and the best result in languages.

For more information about how the EBacc average point score is calculated view the detailed guide to EBacc APS

Staying in education or entering employment

This shows the number of pupils who either stayed in education or went into employment after finishing key stage 4 (after year 11, usually aged 16). This is for pupils who finished year 11 in 2016, which is the most recent data currently available. This figure covers any sustained education or employment destination.

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page

School Performance Tables

School Performance Tables are published by the Secretary of State on the Department for Education’s website. The Tables give information on the achievement and attainment of pupils and include information on finance, absence, school workforce and the most recent Ofsted reports.

The attainment and progress data in the Tables is designed to be considered alongside other sources of information such as Ofsted reports and school prospectuses.

To view the School Performance Tables for The Portsmouth Academy, please visit the Department for Education’s website

For full details see DfE website: https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/school/139714/the-portsmouth-academy/secondary

Please see our local offer document below to find out about our full range of support provided.

The Portsmouth Academy is a member of The Thinking Schools Academy Trust (TSAT), a successful growing family of schools that work together to improve the life chances of all its children and young people. It makes fulfilment, personal development and support of its staff a priority.

View our vacanciesView other vacancies within our Trust

Please note that these links will redirect you to the eteach website.

A career with TSAT has unlimited opportunity. We are passionate in supporting staff with their professional development and believe that the more we invest in our staff the more successful we will become as a Trust of schools.

TSAT is a non-profit making charitable multi academy trust that has successfully grown to include a diverse range of academies in Medway and Portsmouth for pupils aged between 3 and 19.

The lead academy is The Rochester Grammar School which is not only an outstanding school but has a rich history and inspiring reputation as one of the country’s leading state grammar schools.

The Rochester Grammar School is also the lead school in the New Horizons Teaching Schools Alliance, which delivers training and development that is robust, innovatory and is informed by the latest research. As a TSAT employee you will be able to access the full range of resources and expertise of the alliance. Please visit www.newhorizonstsa.com for more information about our Teaching Alliance.

If you share the same passion for improving the life chances of children and young people and would be interested in working for The Portsmouth Academy, or The Thinking Schools Academy Trust, please visit our careers site hosted by our recruitment provider Eteach to join our talent pool and receive job alerts.

For any enquiries regarding our vacancies please email recruitment@tsatrust.org.uk

Frequently Asked Questions

It is never too late to join the teaching profession or make the career jump. There are many different pathways available to allow aspiring teachers to train, we hope to provide answers to your questions regarding how you can begin your career with the Thinking Schools Academy Trust.

We recommend that you get in touch with us to arrange a tour of one of our schools by emailing recruitment@tsatrust.org.uk. You will need a minimum of 10 working days of experience working in a school as a volunteer before you can apply for the scheme via UCAS. We can help you arrange to gain experience in a suitable school within our Trust. You will need to register with UCAS and submit your application for either a salaried or non-salaried teaching position. If your application is successful we will then invite you to interview.

You can pursue either school-lead teacher training or university lead. School-lead training is a hands on approach to gain QTS which provided by The New Horizons Teaching Schools Alliance https://www.newhorizonstsa.org.uk/ .

University lead training is also knows as a Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) which is a one year course which includes QTS.

Please contact our recruitment team recruitment@tsatrust.org.uk to request an application form or to join our talent pool or please visit our eteach page to see our current vacancies and to apply online.

We are very proud of our school, which offers a wonderful education; full of opportunities for young people to ‘Aspire and Achieve.’

We are unique in Portsmouth at specialising in teaching ‘thinking tools’, which help our students to develop their full potential. There are 10,0000 thinking schools worldwide who share a common aim; that both students and staff will think reflectively, critically and creatively in order to create an outstanding educational experience for every child. See http://www.thinkingmatters.com/ for more information on thinking schools worldwide.

Our experience, and national and international research, tells us that young people in thinking schools:

• Achieve a higher self-esteem and greater confidence
• Feel more positive and learn well together as a community
• Maintain their motivation and curiosity to learn
• Improve their academic performance
• Become independent learners who can ‘think for themselves’ and cope with an increasingly complex world

Ofsted have also reported on the links between being an outstanding school and a thinking school which you can read about here.

We all feel happiest when we are surrounded by people who believe in us and encourage us to pursue our goals. In our school, we value the relationships between staff and students which enable every child to ‘Aspire and Achieve’, and so experience the joy that comes with personal success.